Historic PhotographsUnidentified Portrait

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1844-1860. “Unidentified women.” Sixth plate daguerreotype, gold toned. Photograph produced by Mathew Brady’s studio.

15 Unidentified Daguerreotype Portraits

The daguerreotype process was one of the first widely used photographic mediums. First, a silver plate was highly polished, and then introduced to iodine fumes. After the plate was exposed to light through a camera, it was developed with heated mercury, and fixed with sodium thiosulfate. This tedious method often resulted in poorly processed images. While technically unaccomplished, the unintentional blunders produced compelling textures and mysterious portraits that provide interest beyond a perfect picture plane. Curated historic photographs on Photistoric.

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1844-1860. “Unidentified portrait.” Sixth plate daguerreotype, gold toned. Photographer unknown.

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1844-1860. “Unidentified woman, half-length portrait, facing slightly right.” Sixth plate daguerreotype. Photograph produced by Mathew Brady’s studio.

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1844-1860. “Framed painting of unidentified man, head-and-shoulders portrait, facing front.” Sixth plate daguerreotype. Photograph produced by Mathew Brady’s studio.

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1844-1860. “Unidentified woman with spectacles, head-and-shoulders portrait, facing left, wearing lace cap.” Sixth plate daguerreotype, gold toned. Photograph produced by Mathew Brady’s studio.

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1844-1860. “Unidentified man, head-and-shoulders portrait, facing front.” Sixth plate daguerreotype, gold toned. Photograph produced by Mathew Brady’s studio.

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1844-1860. “Unidentified man, head-and-shoulders portrait, slightly to right.” Sixth plate daguerreotype. Photograph produced by Mathew Brady’s studio.

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1844-1860. “Unidentified man, three-quarter length portrait, facing front, wearing a hat.” Sixth plate daguerreotype, gold toned. Photograph produced by Mathew Brady’s studio.

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1844-1860. “Unidentified man, head-and-shoulders portrait, facing front, holding hat.” Sixth plate daguerreotype, gold toned. Photograph produced by Mathew Brady’s studio.

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1844-1860. “Unidentified women.” Half plate daguerreotype, gold toned. Photograph produced by Mathew Brady’s studio.

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1844-1860. “Unidentified woman in theatrical costume.” Half plate daguerreotype, gold toned. Photograph produced by Mathew Brady’s studio.

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1844-1860. “Unidentified woman, about 30 years of age, full-length portrait, three-quarters to the left, seated at a table.” Whole plate daguerreotype, gold toned. Photograph produced by Mathew Brady’s studio.

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1849-1860. “Unidentified women.” Sixth plate daguerreotype. Unknown photographer.

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1844-1860. “Unidentified man.” Half plate daguerreotype, gold toned. Photograph produced by Mathew Brady’s studio.

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1840-1860. “Unidentified man, half-length portrait, facing right.” Quarter plate daguerreotype, cut down. Unknown photographer.

Historic PrintsMuybridge: In Motion

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1893. “The zoopraxiscope–Horse galloping.” Color Lithograph. Print by Eadweard Muybridge.

4 Animated GIFs of Phenakistoscopes by Eadweard Muybridge

In 1879 Eadweard Muybridge invented the first movie projector. Earlier iterations of a spinning sequence of images had come before, but no one had thought to project them through glass and onto a wall. He called his invention the Zoopraxiscope. By combining photography, the magic lantern and the Phenakistoscope, Muybridge was able to project a moving image for an audience of people. Before this eureka moment, Muybridge was creating his own Phenakistoscopes. The Phenakistoscopes seen on this page would produce an illusion of motion when the user spun the disc, and looked through the moving slits at the disc’s reflection in a mirror. These lithographic prints were modeled from Muybridge’s more well known photographic motion studies. These discs represent another phase in Muybridge’s lifelong quest to understand motion and time.

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1893. “The zoopraxiscope–Athletes–Boxing.” Color Lithograph. Print by Eadweard Muybridge.

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1893. “The zoopraxiscope – a couple waltzing.” Color Lithograph. Print by Eadweard Muybridge.

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1893. “The zoopraxiscope – a horse back somersault.” Color Lithograph. Print by Eadweard Muybridge.

Historic PrintsFighting Tuberculosis

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19??. “Ali si zdrav?” Photomechanical Print. Print by ?.

15 Medical Posters from Global Campaigns Against TB

Tuberculosis infection has been found in human remains as far back as the Neolithic Era. During the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, TB was the leading cause of death in the United States. Dr. Edward Livingston Trudeau promoted and established isolation techniques to fight TB in the 1880s. His efforts established an era of prevention and public education. Since then, many visual campaigns have promoted illustrative posters to fight the diseases spread. All of the poster’s in this series were downloaded from the History of Medicine (IHM)collections of the History of Medicine Division (HMD) of the U.S National Library of Medicine (NLM). The posters provide an interesting international case-study of the various approaches designers have taken to convey public health information.

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1984. “Soins de santé primaires la tuberculose.” Photomechanical Print. Print by Comité antituberculeux de Côte d’Ivoire.

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1977. “Allaitement au sein” Photomechanical Print. Print by Comité antituberculeux de Côte d’Ivoire.

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19??. “Achetez le timbre antituberculeux” Photomechanical Print. Print by Comité national de défense contre la tuberculose (France).

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1918. “Il faut vaincre la tuberculose comme le plus malfaisant des reptiles.” Photomechanical Print. Print by Dorival, Géo, b. 1879.

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19??. “Journée nationale des tuberculeux anciens militaires sauvons-les.” Photomechanical Print. Print by Faivre, Abel, 1867-1945.

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19??. “Tuberculosis the foe of youth” Photomechanical Print. Print by ?.

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1920. “Italiani, aiutate la Croce rossa nell’assistenza ai tubercolosi.” Photomechanical Print. Print by Cascella, Basilio, 1860-1950.

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195?. “A fine body may conceal tuberculosis, but modern methods uncover it before it does harm.” Photomechanical Print. Print by American Lung Association Christmas Seals.

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19??. “Tuberculosis, find it, treat it, conquer it” Photomechanical Print. Print by American Lung Association Christmas Seals.

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19??. “A good X-ray is your doctor’s best aid in discovering early tuberculosis.” Photomechanical Print. Print by American Lung Association Christmas Seals.

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196?. “Yu fang fei jie he, bu yao sui di tu tan.” Photomechanical Print. Print by Tianjin ren min yin shua chang.

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19??. “Yu fang jie he bing bu yao sui di tu tan.” Photomechanical Print. Print by Beijing Shi jie he bing fang zhi suo.

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1955. “Yu fang fei lao bing, yao jiao zheng sui di tu tan de xi guan Zhonghua…” Photomechanical Print. Print by China. Wei sheng bu.

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196?. “Jie zhong Ka Jie miao yu fang jie he bing.” Photomechanical Print. Print by Wulumuqi Shi di 2 ren min yi yuan.