WPA Posters

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]

16 Silkscreen Posters from the WPA

Included in Roosevelt’s Works Progress Administration was funding for the Federal Art Project. At the close of the Federal Art Project in 1943, over 200,000 works had been made from artists including Mark Rothko, Grant Wood and Phillip Guston; now known around the world. Along with plays, murals and traditional paintings, many posters were made by artists for organisations also sponsored by the WPA. The incredible diversity of style and subject remain influential for graphic designers and artists today. Vintage prints on Photistoric.

13399u_Photistoric_LOC
1938. “Yellowstone National Park, Ranger Naturalist Service.” Silkscreen. Print by Department of the Interior, National Park Service.
3f05628u_Photistoric_LOC
1936-1941. “More courtesy.” Screen Print. Silkscreen by Federal Art Project.
3f05632u_Photistoric_LOC
1936-1937. “Result Three killed by speeding car at dark corner.” Silkscreen. Print by Federal Art Project.
3f05161u_Photistoric_LOC
1941-1943. “No enemy sub will dare lift its eye if you lend your Zeiss…” Silkscreen. Print by WPA.
3g04725u_Photistoric_LOC
1936-1939. “Your Family Needs…” Silkscreen. Print by Charles Verschuuren.
3f05370u_Photistoric_LOC
1936-1939. “W.P.A. Federal Theatre Presents…” Silkscreen. Print by Emmanuel DeColas.
3f05600u_Photistoric_LOC
1941-1943. “War Industry Needs Water…” Silkscreen. Print by Glenn Stuart Pierce.
3b49074u_Photistoric_LOC
1936-1937. “Save Your Eyes Use…” Silkscreen. Print by WPA Illinois Safety Division.
3f05188u_Photistoric_LOC
1936-1941. “Doctor Lawyer Merchant…” Silkscreen. Print by Illinois WPA Art Project.
3f05733u_Photistoric_LOC
1939. “Indian Court Federal…” Silkscreen. Print by Louis B. Siegriest.
3g05045u_Photistoric_LOC
1936-1939. “Marionette Theatre Presents…” Silkscreen. Print by Charles Verschuuren.
3g05064u_Photistoric_LOC
1936-1941. “Fruit Store.” Silkscreen. Print by Federal Art Project.
3b49066u_Photistoric_LOC
1936-1937. “Failure Here May…” Woodcut. Print by Allan Nase.
31266u_Photistoric_LOC
1936-1940. “Don’t Gum Up…” Silkscreen. Print by Gregg Arlington.
3b48836u_Photistoric_LOC
1936-1941. “Indian Art Of…” Silkscreen. Print by New York City W.P.A. Art Project.

[/expand][/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Folk Anthropology

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]

00318u_Photistoric_LOC
1937. “Woman sitting in car, Texas. Photograph by Ruby Lomax.”
14 Portraits from the Lomax Collection

Alan Lomax was a folk music collector for the Archive of American Folk Song at the Library of Congress. He made acetate and aluminum discs of Woody Guthrie, Lead Belly, Muddy Waters, Jelly Roll Morton and other influential early American musicians. Without the ambitious efforts that included Alan’s father, also a musicologist, and his wife Ruby, many important songs and musicians would have remained undiscovered. Vintage photographs on Photistoric.

00372u_Photistoric_LOC
1935. “Gabriel Brown and Rochelle French, Eatonville, Florida “.Photograph by Alan Lomax.
00382u_Photistoric_LOC
1935. “African American man, sitting outdoors, Eatonville, Florida.” Photograph by Alan Lomax.
00478u (1)_Photistoric_LOC
1935. “Bound for Cat Island, June 1935.” Photograph by Alan Lomax.
00419u_Photistoric_LOC
1934. “African American convicts working with axes, Reed Camp, South Carolina.” Photograph by Alan Lomax.
00557u_Photistoric_LOC
1935. “B’Rabby, Andros Is[land], Bahamas.” Photograph by Alan Lomax.
00548u_Photistoric_LOC
1935. “Man wearing tie, standing, facing front, possibly from the visit by Alan Lomax and Mary Elizabeth Barnicle to Andros Island in the Bahamas.” Photograph by Alan Lomax.
00384u_Photistoric_LOC
1935. “African American children playing singing games, Eatonville, Florida.” Photograph by Alan Lomax.
00562u_Photistoric_LOC
1935. “Man standing on ship, facing right, taken during Bahamas recording expedition.” Photograph by Alan Lomax.
00306u_Photistoric_LOC
1940. “Rosendo Arce at Casa Ricardo Hotel, Kingsville, Texas.” Photograph by Ruby Lomax.
00587u_Photistoric_LOC
1935. “Woman seated in porch swing, Eatonville, Fla., taken during the Lomax, Hurston, Barnicle 1935 expedition to Georgia, Florida and the Bahamas.” Photograph by Alan Lomax.
00522u_Photistoric_LOC
1935. “Alexander Rolle (?), Bailiff (?), Old Bight, Cat Island, July 1935.” Photograph by Alan Lomax.
00600u_Photistoric_LOC
1935. “Smiling woman, three-quarter-length portrait of unidentified person standing outdoors.” Photograph by Alan Lomax.
00599u_Photistoric_LOC
1935. “Man seated holding guitar, Eatonville, Fla.” Photograph by Alan Lomax.

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Minnesota Loggers

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]

FSA/8a22000/8a223008a22362a.tif
1937. “Old lumberjack, over seventy and still working at camp near Effie, Minnesota.” Photograph by Russell Lee.
15 historic photographs by Russell Lee of Lumberjacks in Minnesota.

Minnesota’s history is synonymous with logging. In 1937, Russell lee traveled to lumber camps in rural Minnesota. Writing to Lee, a friend and fellow photographer said of International Falls Minnesota that as “one of the toughest towns on the border, it is a meeting place of Lumberman, indian traders, trappers, smugglers, immigration and refugee smugglers, and so on. They used to kill a man every morning before breakfast and one just before supper, just for amusement.” The following images were taken by Lee when he was employed by the Farm Security Administration. Vintage Photographs on Photistoric.

FSA/8a21000/8a219008a21996a.tif
1937. “Camp cook blowing dinner horn, at camp near Effie, Minnesota.” Photograph by Russell Lee.
FSA/8a21000/8a219008a21990a.tif
1937. “Loaders pushing logs into place while loading car, lumbercamp near Effie, Minnesota.” Photograph by Russell Lee.
FSA/8b36000/8b369008b36905a.tif
1937.”Operators of the loading machine at logging camp near Effie, Minnesota.” Photograph by Russell Lee.
FSA/8b36000/8b369008b36906a.tif
1937. “Construction of stalls and barn at logging camp near Effie, Minnesota.” Photograph by Russell Lee.
FSA/8b36000/8b369008b36901a.tif
1937. “Partially-loaded car of lumber near Effie, Minnesota.” Photograph by Russell Lee.
FSA/8b36000/8b368008b36893a.tif
1937. “Going into the woods for another load. Logging camp near Effie, Minnesota.” Photograph by Russell Lee.
FSA/8b36000/8b365008b36597a.tif
1937. “Lumberjack turning handspring near Littlefork, Minnesota.” Photograph by Russell Lee.
FSA/8a22000/8a223008a22335a.tif
1937. “Lumberjack with bandaged head after being beaten up and “rolled” in a saloon on Saturday night in Craigsville, Minnesota.” Photograph by Russell Lee.
FSA/8a22000/8a223008a22339a.tif
1937. ” Lumberjack at Effie, Minnesota.” Photograph by Russell Lee.
FSA/8a21000/8a218008a21887a.tif
1937. “Lumberjacks in front of the Durman Hotel, Little Fork, Minnesota.” Photograph by Russell Lee.
FSA/8a21000/8a219008a21978a.tif
1937. “Lumberjack waiting for load of logs to be pulled away near Effie, Minnesota.” Photograph by Russell Lee.
FSA/8b36000/8b369008b36907a.tif
1937. “Loading logs onto railroad car near Effie, Minnesota.” Photograph by Russell Lee.
FSA/8b36000/8b365008b36599a.tif
1937. “Old resident of Margie, Minnesota. A former lumberjack.” Photograph by Russell Lee.

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

The Migrant

"Ex-tenant farmer on relief grant in the Imperial Valley, California." Photograph by Dorothea Lange.
“Ex-tenant farmer on relief grant in the Imperial Valley, California.” Photograph by Dorothea Lange.
23 Photographs from the Dust Bowl
More than 5,000 people died from the heatwave of 1936. It was the hottest summer on record. Those crops that hadn’t withered in the first half of the decade now failed. People collapsed from exhaustion in their homes. The summer of 1936 marked the most desperate point of a four year drought and a decade long economic depression that displaced 2.5 million people. This time came to be known as the Dust Bowl.
Unseasonable heavy rain in the years preceding 1930 convinced farmers that aggressive ploughing was acceptable, when in reality a very thin topsoil was only protected by a thin layer of grass. When precipitation did not materialize, the exposed soil quickly dried. High winds, which were not uncommon, were now able to pick up millions of pounds of dried soil and blow it in huge rolling black clouds. Towns were abandoned. The largest exodus of Americans occurred in the 1930’s as a result of this agricultural disaster. Poor and hungry, whole families traveled west for work.
The high-resolution photographs of migrant workers in this series show the men, women and children who lived during this troubled time. Among others, Dororthea Lange was hired by the Farm Security Administration to document the Dust Bowl. During this time, she created some of her most iconic images.
Out of a collection of thousands of photographs from the Library of Congress, the following portraits have been chosen for their emotion and technical quality.

Curated historic photography on Photistoric.

8c35333u_Photistoric_LOC
1940. “Group of Florida migrants on their way to Cranberry, New Jersey, to pick potatoes. Near Shawboro, North Carolina.” Photograph by Jack Delano.
FSA/8b38000/8b387008b38740a.tif
1939. “Nebraska farmer come to pick peas. Near Calipatria, California.” Photograph by Dorothea Lange.
FSA/8b38000/8b384008b38480a.tif
1936. “Drought refguees from Oklahoma camping by the roadside. They hope to work in the cotton fields. The official at the border (California-Arizona) inspection service said that on this day, August 17, 1936, twenty-three car loads and truck loads of migrant families out of the drought counties of Oklahoma and Arkansas had passed throught that station entering California up to 3 o’clock in the afternoon.” Photo by Dorothea Lange.
FSA/8b38000/8b382008b38218.tif
1936. “Occupants–one more home on wheels. California.” Photograph by Dorothea Lange.
FSA/8b33000/8b334008b33401a.tif
1939. “Arkansas girl in migrant camp near Greenfield, Salinas Valley, California. This is an Arkansawyers auto camp, filled almost completely with Arkansawyers recently in California. Rent ten dollars per month for one room, iron bed, electric light.” Photograph by Dorthea Lange.
FSA/8b31000/8b316008b31636a.tif
1939. “Grandmother of twenty-two children living in Kern County migrant camp. California.” Photograph by Dorothea Lange.
FSA/8b31000/8b316008b31640a.tif
1936. “Drought refugee from Polk, Missouri. Awaiting the opening of orange picking season at Porterville, California.” Photograph by Dorothea Lange.
1937. "A mother in California who with her husband and her two children will be returned to Oklahoma by the Relief Administration." This family had lost a two-year-old baby during the winter as a result of exposure. Photograph by Dorothea Lange.
1937. “A mother in California who with her husband and her two children will be returned to Oklahoma by the Relief Administration.” This family had lost a two-year-old baby during the winter as a result of exposure. Photograph by Dorothea Lange.
8b32434u_Photistoric_LOC
1938. “Wife of a migratory laborer with three children. Near Childress, Texas. Nettie Featherston.” Photograph by Dororthea Lange.
FSA/8b33000/8b333008b33360a.tif
1939. “In a carrot pullers’ camp near Holtville, Imperial Valley, California. Woman from Broken Row, Oklahoma.” Photograph by Dorothea Lange.
3c30150u_Photistoric_LOC
1939. “A migrant laborer waiting for work in one of the packing houses near Canal Point, Florida.” Photograph by Marion Post Wolcott.
8a06762u_Photistoric_LOC
1940. “Migrant child, Berrien County, Michigan.” Photograph by John Vachon.
8a08229u_Photistoric_LOC
1937. “Part of the family of a migrant fruit worker from Tennessee, camped near the packinghouse in Winter Haven, Florida.” Photograph by Arthur Rothstein.
FSA/8a24000/8a246008a24675a.tif
1938. “Migrant worker resting along roadside, Hancock County, Mississippi.” Photograph by Russell Lee.
FSA/8a25000/8a251008a25162a.tif
1939. “Child of migrant worker sitting on bed in tent home of cotton picking sacks, Harlingen, Texas.” Photograph by Russell Lee.
Daughter of migrant in doorway of trailer, Sebastin, Texas." Photograph by Russell Lee.
Daughter of migrant in doorway of trailer, Sebastin, Texas.” Photograph by Russell Lee.
FSA/8b28000/8b285008b28501a.tif
1937. “A migrant worker from Oklahoma. Deerfield, Florida.” Photograph by Arthur Rothstein.
FSA/8b29000/8b294008b29478a.tif
1936. “This man is a labor contractor in the pea fields of California. ‘One-Eye’ Charlie gives his views. ‘I’m making my living off of these people (migrant laborers) so I know the conditions.’ San Luis Obispo County, California.” Photograph by Dorothea Lange.
8b29527u_Photistoric_LOC
1936. “Migrant agricultural worker’s family. Seven hungry children. Mother aged thirty-two. Father is native Californian. Nipomo, California.” Photograph by Dorothea Lange.
"Migrant shed worker. Northeast Florida." Photograph by Dorothea Lange.
“Migrant shed worker. Northeast Florida.” Photograph by Dorothea Lange.
FSA/8b29000/8b296008b29696a.tif
1936. “Migrant shed worker. Northeast Florida.” Photograph by Dorothea Lange.
8b29843u_Photistoric_LOC
1936. “Eighty year old woman living in squatters’ camp on the outskirts of Bakersfield, California. ‘If you lose your pluck you lose the most there is in you – all you’ve got to live with.'” Photograph by Dorothea Lange.